StudioVeena.com Forums Discussions What you look for in a good studio

  • What you look for in a good studio

    Posted by earthpanther on June 6, 2010 at 2:37 pm

    Hello All,
    I want your input as to what makes for a great pole dancing studio. I learned pole dancing at the only studio in town and then they asked me to work there. I have been teaching pole for them for a little over a year now. I am trying to learn more about pole dancing everyday. I feel slightly stifled where I work. Also, after reading this forum and checking out other websites I’m thinking where I work is not so great with proper move progression and safety. I am thinking of opening my own studio. So I want to ask you all what makes a great pole dancing studio? Feel free to also let me know what makes for a bad studio.
    Thanks a Bunch!!!!

    Charley replied 13 years, 11 months ago 11 Members · 20 Replies
  • 20 Replies
  • chemgoddess1

    Member
    June 6, 2010 at 2:46 pm

    There was just a thread about this a little bit ago. You may find this helpful.

  • earthpanther

    Member
    June 6, 2010 at 4:21 pm

    There was just a thread about this a little bit ago. You may find this helpful.

    Thanks chemgoddess, I’ve already read that forum. I guess I’m more interested in other aspects, like ideal class size, own pole vs. sharing pole, safety/crash mats or no, etc.

  • chemgoddess1

    Member
    June 6, 2010 at 5:27 pm

    Sharing a pole works in the beginning because it is physically taxing and gives students a chance to rest. For an instructor it means double explanations.

    Class size…I would say no more than 5-6 per class and that is even difficult because people progress at different levels and at times you can feel like you are spending more time with one student than the rest.

    Crash mats are a good idea once you start inverting. I think along with this if you teach the students how to spot one another it gives them another level to poling and more respect for the art and dangers.

  • Vertfit

    Member
    June 6, 2010 at 6:45 pm

    If you check out http://www.poleskivvies.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;, Jennifer has some very informative and hilarious articles relating to this topic. Some of them include "How to teach Pole and be a danger to the public" or "Top ten traits of good pole dance instructors". They are listed under her "Most popular posts".

  • MilienElayne

    Member
    June 7, 2010 at 10:32 am

    What I am currently looking for and have been totally impressed and excited to find: tall, thin, solid brass poles with the option to spin or remain static. Instructors who are seasoned public performers and/or can prove decent pole exposure and pole related social networking but are (or flawlessly seem to be) also friendly, honest and real. Mirrors floor to ceiling (or as close as possible). Nowhere seems to have these though: changing room with lockers and showers (polers work up a sweat and some have to travel a long way home), adequate stretching/warmup/hanging out space for before and after classes (I have long hyperextended legs: sometimes I need like 2m sq just for me) – this can also double as seating/standing area for performances/showcases/open nights/functions. I hate feeling rushed and/or unwelcome – I like time, space and freedom to stretch out and to have a relaxed and even extended chat with my pole girls after or between classes. Receptionists should be the most friendly, helpful, welcoming people you can muster… For example, chatting with a genuinely smiling receptionist before leaving the studio can instantly make up for any failed move, a not-chirpy-as-usual instructor, a broken high-heel, sore muscles…etc. and help you leave feeling pole-happy! This is all just my opinion and personal preference.

  • Judy Jovanelly

    Member
    June 7, 2010 at 1:07 pm

    Nowhere seems to have these though: changing room with lockers and showers (polers work up a sweat and some have to travel a long way home), adequate stretching/warmup/hanging out space for before and after classes

    the studio owner’s DREAM ! i would love to have a shower on premises !!!! starting up a ‘brick and mortar’ studio is kind of expensive, so our priority was to secure a pretty reasonable space, with a pretty reasonable monthly rent, in a safe and pleasant area, which took priority over some of the nicer amenities. we also originally planned to remove an existing drop celing so we could go to 12′ on our poles, but the landlord panicked after we removed the ceiling and insisted we put it back. we gained just over 9 feet for the poles, but still not ideal. did my space match my vision exactly ? no. is it workable until such time as we may grow? yup

    so, space aside, even more important to us is the learning environment we offer our students. SAFETY first, followed by tons of encouragement, compassion and understanding.

    https://www.studioveena.com/img/smilies/icon_e_smile.gif

  • nymphdancer

    Member
    June 7, 2010 at 2:16 pm

    heck having a restroom in the place is a plus let alone a shower. The studio I’m at you have to go down the hall past offices and use a key https://www.studioveena.com/img/smilies/icon_e_confused.gif

  • Judy Jovanelly

    Member
    June 7, 2010 at 2:22 pm

    heck having a restroom in the place is a plus let alone a shower

    LOL ! at least we lucked out with that and have a fairly nice bathroom right in our space.

  • nymphdancer

    Member
    June 7, 2010 at 2:56 pm

    ok on a more serious note:

    my basic wish list would be a really good teacher that can explain things a variety of ways so that all students can "get it" that has a strong focus on safety and good order progression. A safe" studio. Meaning floors and poles in prime working order. Mats for inverts. A restroom and changing area.

    I can get by with just a good basic studio if it has the right teacher. With the wrong teacher you could have the Walt Disney World of studio’s and I’m not going to be impressed.

    On the subject of mirrors I’m not a fan of them at all.

  • amy

    Member
    June 7, 2010 at 3:54 pm

    i think the single biggest thing that i (personally) look for is ENERGY OF THE STUDIO.

    what is the vibe of the studio? is it clear that you should be having fun in class? do they not take themselves too seriously? do they truly believe that everyone can learn or do they give more attention to more capable students? is there a genuine atmosphere of caring and empathy and learning and teaching that occurs not just between student and teacher but between other students? do the teachers have control over their classes but still keep it upbeat? are they able to break down every movement a few different ways for different people while still keeping everyone’s attention? is it cliquey or is everyone welcoming and really smiling? the energy that you put into the studio is what transfers through all the employees and in turn gets picked up by the students.

    i honestly don’t care if a studio has mirrors, stainless or brass poles, a shower or not. if it has poles, and a wooden floor, with room to swing without hitting anything, that’s enough for me. i go to crunch where they have all those things, plus a steam room, and experienced teachers that are group-fitness certified and able to break moves down– but i still don’t enjoy classes there. in my opinion, that is ALL secondary to the feeling you get when you walk in the door: are you excited to take class? will you be motivated and pushed to learn and work hard? if not, then it doesn’t matter at all what’s in the room.

  • Judy Jovanelly

    Member
    June 7, 2010 at 4:12 pm

    what is the vibe of the studio?

    that is a great point, and IMO it applies to pretty much anywhere you plan to ‘spend your money’, whether it is a pole studio or a grocery store !

  • minicoopergrl

    Member
    June 8, 2010 at 10:33 am

    Sometimes I feel a bit spolied when it comes to the studio I go to. We have 2 rooms in the studio – one for pole and one for floor/chair. There is also a changing room/bathrooms/lounge area. That has a sink w/a few on the go ammenities (spray deodorant, soap, baby powder etc), theres also a love seat and coffee table. They have now started offerering a mini spa since some of the instructors are certified in cosmetolgy. They have a massuse (sp?) who comes to the studio a few times a week for massages. That is all offered to the clients. The pole room has 20 poles and one wall has long mirrors. The floor/chair is a larger space that can fit a large about of women in for class. I actually love everyone that works there and most of the clients as well. In the hallway there are pictures of clients from past events and past instructors as well. Im even on the wall as well.

    I love everything about Xpose. Is there a few things I wish they had? yes of course. I wish for some later classes during the week. Last class is 7 or 730 depending on the day. I also thought that if I were to open my own studio, I would like to put a childcare in it. I know alot of women want to go but cant find time b/c they need a sitter. If there was a fee of $3/kid/class I think morning classes would be a bit busier. I used to work in a child care for a gym so I know about the ins and outs.

  • MilienElayne

    Member
    June 8, 2010 at 10:59 am

    Awesome point! Atmosphere.

    What about a studio can cause you to not enjoy classes?

    I will still enjoy classes themselves as long as it’s with an instructor I know and like, I have made friends in class and the receptionist is welcoming, but as to general vibe and wanting to be loyal to one studio and aspiring to compete and work for them one day… I am put off by underlying bitchiness and politics… Someone might be an awesome actress and businesswoman, her smile could make any stranger fall in love with her and she can be very successful, but eventually I will be able to tell, when her mask slips and her actions speak, if she’s full of crap and just not a nice person. Nothing misses the grape vine.

  • miss fern

    Member
    June 8, 2010 at 11:32 am

    Sharing a pole works in the beginning because it is physically taxing and gives students a chance to rest. For an instructor it means double explanations.

    Hold on, I’m confused. Why does pole sharing mean double explaining for instructors? You still address the whole class at once https://www.studioveena.com/img/smilies/icon_scratch.gif

    As an instructor for beginner to intermediates, I am a HUGE pan of pole sharing. I know many beginners may be disappointed about not having their own pole, because don’t feel they get "their money’s worth" or "enough practice time". But there is no way a beginner can sustain pole practice for one hour hour with no breaks. They usually realise this after a free taster class, anyway. And so they are happy with the class sizes from then on.

    Also keep in mind that since pole dancing is such a thrill, some students don’t know when to stop and this can lead to injury if they exercise too much without suitable prior fitness level. So it makes much more sense to share poles so the student is FORCED to rest and thus avoid unnecessary injuries.

  • chemgoddess1

    Member
    June 8, 2010 at 11:55 am

    Sharing a pole works in the beginning because it is physically taxing and gives students a chance to rest. For an instructor it means double explanations.

    Hold on, I’m confused. Why does pole sharing mean double explaining for instructors? You still address the whole class at once https://www.studioveena.com/img/smilies/icon_scratch.gif

    And when learning a new move how many actually retain it for the minute or so before they get on the pole themselves? Especially if you are showing hand/body placement.

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