StudioVeena.com Forums Discussions Studio Owners

  • Studio Owners

    Posted by poletrickster on May 8, 2010 at 5:05 am

    If you own your own studio can you tell me how you got started and if you had any business management skills prior. Pros, Cons and anything else that would help me discover if this is something I should pursue. Also to teach pole do you have to know all of the advanced moves? Thanks in advance

    Mary Ellyn replied 10 years, 9 months ago 24 Members · 62 Replies
  • 62 Replies
  • chemgoddess1

    Member
    May 8, 2010 at 1:53 pm

    I am not a studio owner but I will comment about advanced moves. Currently in town there is really no one who knows them, let alone teach them. One studio owner does not even invert, so I have heard. I have stopped taking lessons because it was more of a pole play session than a lesson. Within a year and a half some of the students are outgrowing the instructors and there is no one in town to keep those students interested.

  • SissyBuns

    Member
    May 8, 2010 at 2:08 pm

    I agree with what Chem said. You don’t have to be advanced to own a studio or to teach pole, but eventually you’re going to need somebody advanced to teach your students for when they become advanced.

  • Charley

    Member
    May 8, 2010 at 3:00 pm

    It’s not even about being advanced but knowing a very wide array of moves and tricks and how to teach them and how to modify them to make them easier or harder.

    I’ve got a class now where they are still kicking up into their inverts so inverts were taken away but I need more than laybacks and climbing so I taught them side climb to cupid/knee swing, basic teddy bear, aerial fan kicks to pole sit, peter pan, pole bend, sidespin/can opener to star, thigh hold, the roxy, cradle variations. You get the idea.

    Also, being able to take those moves and show people how to use transitions, spins and tricks together is really important, especially in the beginning. I teach beginners only 1-2 spins per class, we spend the time working out the spins on both sides then do a little off the cuff routine on both sides, we do it several times too so that if they are not getting a certain area of choreo/steps/trick I can help them and get them to go through the moves seamlessly.

    Remember you are teaching movement, not just moves.

    The studio I work is just me and the owner. We don’t necessarily agree on pole dance and how it should be taught and it’s hard for us to teach each others classes. I have a girl who goes to both of our classes and I just got her into her scorpio (her first inverted pose) and when she told the owner the owner tried to get her to do an aerial invert?!? Which angered me as this student is not ready for that. Goes back to point 1 – not advanced moves, lots of moves.
    At this point I personally have no interest opening a studio we have tons of pole places around here…I prefer being a free agent and working at as many places as I can.

  • chemgoddess1

    Member
    May 8, 2010 at 3:59 pm

    I’ve got a class now where they are still kicking up into their inverts so inverts were taken away but I need more than laybacks and climbing so I taught them side climb to cupid/knee swing, basic teddy bear, aerial fan kicks to pole sit, peter pan, pole bend, sidespin/can opener to star, thigh hold, the roxy, cradle variations. You get the idea.

    This right here is HUGE. I can see each move as you are saying it. If someone is going to teach pole they NEED TO LEARN NAMES OF MOVES AND VARIATIONS!!!! I work full time and have a 45 minute commute but I am still able to do a little research on a weekly basis and learn what these moves are. No studio owner is THAT BUSY that they cannot go to wikipole or watch a few youtube videos to see what their students are inquiring about.

    OK….end rant.

  • poletrickster

    Member
    May 8, 2010 at 4:39 pm

    Thank you so much for the replies. The nearest pole studio is 4 hours away, I live in a HUGE Mormon area so I do not even know if a studio would be welcomed by our community. I still have a lot to learn I am just thinking about the future.

  • Mary Ellyn

    Member
    May 8, 2010 at 7:40 pm

    The other girls will certainly agree with this as well but I just want to emphasize it’s not just about teaching a wide range of moves but about teaching them correctly. I have advanced students who make requests to learn things they see on Youtube all the time…I know they can break it down and try it on their own ….but THEY know that I know what to consider as far as muscle groups and safe body mechanics as well as the potential errors that can come with each move so they ask me to teach it to them.

    They know that if I don’t know the move, I’ll research it and learn it on my own so that I can apply the above principals to it based on my experience and expertise.

    So there is a LOT of responsibility to being a studio owner/teacher. I spend HOURS each week researching and experimenting. I know I could not do as good of a job as I do teaching if I had another job that took up the typical 40+ hour work week.

    As for business management experience…this is absolutely crucial to either have it yourself or have someone you can consult with. We have met and spoken with so many who have started up their pole business and established practices which are illegal, unsafe, or just plain wasted time and money. (Big example…studios that open under an LLC! Don’t even get me started!) If you don’t have the background, consult (and yes PAY) for someone who does! People just hop into this thinking it’s just teaching pole dancing but there is a lot more to managing than some people realize.

  • nilla

    Member
    May 9, 2010 at 7:44 pm

    We have met and spoken with so many who have started up their pole business and established practices which are illegal, unsafe, or just plain wasted time and money. (Big example…studios that open under an LLC! Don’t even get me started!)

    Business newb here. Why is it a bad idea to open a pole studio under an LLC?

    Poletrickster I’m kind of in the same boat as you. I’d like to teach pole fitness classes someday but I live in a big mormon community also. I think the marketing/business image will have to be planned out with careful consideration for the community. I’m sure there have been pole studios opened in more conservative communities than ours https://www.studioveena.com/img/smilies/icon_e_smile.gif

    I’m actually leaning more toward doing bachelorette parties that people host in their homes, or introducing pole classes at already established local gyms, or at the community center. Most likely I will try to start teaching a pole class where I currently work (a fitness/weight loss retreat). I have thought of opening a studio, but I don’t feel I would have the experience necessary to start with that. I think these other things would be a better entry into the business for me, and if I do become more experienced and decide to open a studio later on, I think these things will have helped me prepare a bit more for owning a studio.

  • FreeTheSun

    Member
    May 10, 2010 at 2:53 am

    This right here is HUGE. I can see each move as you are saying it. If someone is going to teach pole they NEED TO LEARN NAMES OF MOVES AND VARIATIONS!!!! I work full time and have a 45 minute commute but I am still able to do a little research on a weekly basis and learn what these moves are. No studio owner is THAT BUSY that they cannot go to wikipole or watch a few youtube videos to see what their students are inquiring about.

    I agree. This makes such a difference to how students view you. It’s not hard at all to do and it gives you so much more cred.

  • sable

    Member
    May 10, 2010 at 4:39 am

    Just curious what does LLC stand for? And would anyone know what the average rate and instructor makes? – Sable

  • sable

    Member
    May 10, 2010 at 4:40 am

    Also I agree the instructors should know the names of tricks.

  • AliciaPolerina

    Member
    May 11, 2010 at 3:24 am

    LLC= limited liability coorporation

  • earthpanther

    Member
    May 13, 2010 at 3:21 pm

    Big example…studios that open under an LLC! Don’t even get me started! Can someone explain to me the problem with opening as an LLC. The studio I currently work for is an LLC. Also, after reading a couple of business books it seems like a perfectly legitimate option.

  • nymphdancer

    Member
    May 13, 2010 at 9:23 pm

    Also I agree the instructors should know the names of tricks.

    well there is a problem with that. some of these moves have 2-4 names! it is driving me crazy lol. https://www.studioveena.com/img/smilies/icon_e_confused.gif But I agree with Chem, time should be made to do the research. You might not have the answer at your fingertips at the moment of class, but there are ways of finding out. https://www.studioveena.com/img/smilies/icon_e_ugeek.gif

  • Mary Ellyn

    Member
    May 16, 2010 at 12:40 am

    Well I never said it wasn’t a legitimate option…but see that’s the point. If you don’t talk to someone who knows what the difference is AND how it applies to a pole studio.

    The benefits of being an LLC are irrelevant for most pole studios and there is NO difference in how you’re taxed or payed if you set up correctly as a corporation.

    So many new businesses get steered into being an LLC, which costs MUCH more than Inc, etc and yet they don’t need to spend that money. Plus renewal remains higher for an LLC so you keep spending more each time your renewal comes up.

    This is why reading books, or reading online or going to someone who is not a financial consultant may be misleading.

  • Mary Ellyn

    Member
    May 16, 2010 at 1:02 am

    Just to add more…there are so many things that new business owners don’t know about local regulations and laws.

    1. Did you know that you must have a PRO license in order to use music in your studio or even in someone’s home if you teach? That you can be penalized up to $30,000 PER SONG if a PRO finds you using their music and you don’t have their license?

    2. Did you know that you need a waiver for every person who uses a pole at a party or your studio? That that waiver doesn’t protect you from a lawsuit but you still have to have it or you may wind up with appearing negligent?

    3. Did you know that you cannot teach in your home if your local ordinances say you must be "zoned" for business and that in the US MOST residential areas are not zoned for business? So if you are operating against local ordainances your insurance companay may deny a claim AFTER your student is injured and sues you?

    4. Did you know that regardless of being incorporated, if you teach from your home your home is at risk if you are sued?

    5. Did you know this all applies to "just teaching parties"?

    6. Did you know that an instructor working for you who teaches outside your studio (like in her home, at a party, hired by a local businss, among friends, etc) can put your company at risk?

    7. Do you know that most insurance companies would not cover you if you allow students or guests at a party drink alcohol prior to or during lessons or a party?

    There is so much more to running a pole dancing business than just putting a pole up and teaching…let alone teaching well. I’m not trying to be snotty…but these are the situations we’ve run into when we train new instructors.

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