Twisted grip handspring/aysha shoulder pain

 
CarissaRose21

I just recently started learning more aysha/handspring positions (elbow and twisted grip) and while I actually find twisted grip a lot easier to hold, this morning the shoulder of my bottom arm hurts sooo bad! I can't really tell if it's just super sore, or if I did something to it. It feels like dead weight, I can barely lift it up my arm to do anything at all. Is this normal/has this happened to anyone else before? I hope it's just a case of extreme muscle fatigue. What's strange is that my top arm (twisted wrist) doesn't really hurt at all! I was always warned about wrist injuries from the TG aysha but my wrist feels fine and my shoulder doesn't hurt, just a little sore.
Nov 20, 2012
BobbiLea
Hi I'm also learning the twisted grip hand spring. I find that my bottom arm around my elbow was painful this morning but not so bad tonight. I'm unsure of this move as it has a huge potential to stuff rotator cuffs, damage elbows. I dont get the shoulder pain i make sure i properly warmed up first tgen some little stretches before I start.

Some people in my class are getting it no worries. Others aren't ( like me) and have been struggling with it for months. It is a requirement to pass one of our advanced levels to move on to the next level. Which I understand because its used a lot at our studio to transition into even more advanced moves. But I think I'll be working on this one for a while.
Nov 20, 2012
Ekinkah
I am no expert on ayshas, handsprings or any tg moves as I am still struggling to successfully execute any of them, but some advice given to me regarding the bottom arm is to ensure that it is "in line", ie the middle of the pole, the middle of your palm, your elbow, your shoulder and then your torso, make a straight line and are stacked over each other in regards to your weight distribution and centre. For example, if your elbow is hyperextended (not engaged and with the inner aspect of it extended outwards), then the joint is not in line, not balancing the weight as best it could and thus will hurt (the line it makes will not be straight). Maybe you are doing this to your shoulder?

If this is poor advice, please correct me! As I said I am still learning these moves! :)
Nov 21, 2012
chemgoddess1 Paid Member

There are a ton of threads here regarding pain from handsprings and split grips.  Most of it comes down to 3 things: improper form, improper strength or kicking into the move.

 

As for a studio that requires TG handspring to move up a level....I cannot even go there.  Just wow.
Nov 21, 2012
Ekinkah

I am inclined to agree, chemgoddess - while I think it is not very encouraging to require certain moves to attain a higher level, I do understand the necessity in some cases, ie to ensure you do not attempt things above your strength level (keeping it safe), or to make sure you are not in a class full of hanspringers learning variations when you could be better served working on basics (better and safer for you, better for your class). Maybe it would be okay for some handspring moves to be required to move up, ie to ensure you are not out of your depth of strength in the next class up, but I think TG is not something that should be required, ever. Don't a lot of studios ban it because of the injury risk? Can't some people simply not get this move due to wrist and shoulder differences? Ugh.
Nov 21, 2012
chemgoddess1 Paid Member

No, I am not saying that there are not certain skills that you need to advance, I was not saying that at all.  I was saying that TG being a requirement in my opinion in ludicrous. 
Nov 21, 2012
Ekinkah
I didn't say you said that at all - don't worry, I didn't misunderstand what you were saying! I was just discussing level requirements as a topic in general and my thoughts on it. And as I said above, I agree that specifically a TG requirement is a bit ridiculous - its not a move for everyone, and was I correct in saying some places ban or done teach it due to it being dangerous (to the joints, and worse for some people etc)?
Nov 21, 2012
CarissaRose21

I agree with all of the above posts that I think TG handspring should not be a requirement  to move up a level. My pole studio that I train at does not have any 'levels', they have always been mixed level classes and the instructor caters to who is in the class. Sometimes it can be difficult to focus on new moves when there are tons of beginners who are just learning spins, but it doesn't bother me. I like to work at my own pace and my instructor is always there if I need a spotter.

As far as my OP, thanks for everyones advice thus far. I think my body is just not used to holding it's entire weight with just my arms, I'm going on day 2 after my last practice and it's starting to feel a little better. As far as my form goes, I'd say it's pretty spot-on to what it's supposed to look like. I will try to upload a picture that I took during my last practice, but my shoulders are centered, my body is facing up, and my lower arm is slightly bent and not locked into position.

What's strange to me is how comfortable it felt when I was there (even though I am paying the price now), and I am someone who suffers from small hands that get incredibly sweaty and my studio only has 50's so I'm always complaining about my grip.

I also apologize if this was already spoken about in previous threads ^_^
Nov 21, 2012
 
Wennajo Previous Paid Member
I am so glad I found Studio Veena! It's like having an amazing instructor right here with you at home at all times, I absolutely love the way she explains things and her videos are so clear it's easy to see what I'm supposed to be doing. Thank you Veena!!
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